My Latest Abstract Portland Stone Sculpture Time

My Most Recent Sculpture

I’m really pleased with this last sculpture made out of Portland Stone & Mild steel. It’s been a while since I had the idea and making it real is so satisfying. Only problem is that it’s given me loads of future sculptures to make. The variations are endless. I do like the advice of Sculptor Isamu Noguchi ” Just make something and the idea will come afterwards.” Also how the American Sculptor David Smith talked about not being able to physically make all of his ideas into Sculptures. The brains imagination leaps ahead to what could be. But the hands take a little longer to make them in the real world.

Inspiration

At times I have a job trying to remember what inspired me to make a particular sculpture. Could it be my School visit to Cheddar Caves and the fabulous Stalactites and Stalagmites? (‘mites go up and the ‘tites come down.) Or could it be my fascination with reflections in water. The half seen boulder eventually covered by the incoming tide? I think it’s a combination of these memories, milling around my brain. Combining with the knowledge of the materials I use and how to make the sculpture concrete. ( Mistakes are made until I find the solution!)

I particularly like the combination of different materials in my Sculptures. Contrasting their innate strengths. Steel for its tensile strength and linear sharpness. Stone for its Solidity, Grain and Mass.

Not forgetting that amazing force in nature called Gravity. The weakest force in the universe. For sculptors this is what we play with. How the Sculpture stands. Before sculptures were placed on a plinth disconnecting it from the ground. The sculptor Brancusi was the first to integrate the base with his work. Becoming a unity. His work is so inspirational. One of my heroes.

Now on Show at Sculpture by the Lakes

I am so pleased to be showing my work at Sculpture by the Lakes. Such a fantastic venue. The sculptures come alive when their placed in this setting. The trees striving upwards for light and the ripples moving along the lakes surface. A big thank you to Simon, Monique Gudgeon as well as Lyn who helped me install the sculpture along the trail. Do have a visit there is such a great selection of different styles of sculptures and material your bound to find something you like. Also great food. Yum yum.

John Davey Sculpture at Sculpture by the Lakes.
“Time” Portland Stone & Mild Steel. Sculpture by the Lakes.

Onto the Next Idea

As a painter can’t paint or draw without paper or canvas. Neither can a sculptor carve without any materials. So off to choose some nice blocks of stone at the Dorset supplier Southern Stone. They have a great range of tools and different marbles, soapstone’s. Lets see where I go from there? Tonnes of ideas. Feel free to follow me and any feedback is appreciated. Off chipping.

4 thoughts on “My Latest Abstract Portland Stone Sculpture Time

  1. Anonymous says:

    You have a touch of magic in your hands which makes your sculptures appear as ethereal wonders! Beauty in its finest form!
    M.B. (AKA big sis)! 💚

    • johndaveyartist says:

      Thank you so much, I really do it for myself and am always looking to do better. But I do feel spurred on by the people who appreciate my work. Thank you.

  2. Christine says:

    Your combinations of stone and wood or metal are interesting. What qualities does the Sabutu wood have that you used as a ‘frame’; is it strength, texture, or contrast with the relative eternities of stone? Where do you source the woods?

    Do you work and form the metal yourself in addition to carving stone?

    Thank you for very informative posts, much appreciated.

    Christine

    • johndaveyartist says:

      Thanks for that Christine.
      I particularly liked the colour and grain with the Sabutu wood and its contrast to the creamy portland stone.
      The idea of that sculpture came to me when I was working on a new house in France.
      A second storey doorway which was leading out to a yet to made balcony had some pieces of wood leant in between the frame for safety reasons. I sourced the wood at https://www.yandles.co.uk/

      As for the metalwork, I let the work out to a Metalworking Craftsman. Although I was taught some metalworking techniques at art school it always scared me. Thanks again for your enquiry and kind words. John.

I,d love to get any feedback about my work, feel free to comment.

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